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3 Reason to Re-Grip Your Golf Clubs

by: Golf Gear on

3 Reasons Why You Should Re-Grip Your Golf Clubs 1. The most important reason is because golf clubs fitted with old, worn or smooth grips tend to twist in your hands during impact robbing you of length and accuracy. To hit the golf ball long and straight you must have control over your golf club and to do that your golf grips must be in good condition. Long straight shots will help to drop your score. 2. To improve your touch and feel around the green. As grips age they become hard and smooth and your feel and touch around the green diminishes. New grips will fee  ...read more

Keep your balls warm and get more distance

by: Golf Gear on

Keep your balls warm and get more distance. The molecules of a warm golf ball are very active, moving at very high speeds so the ball is very elastic. But in a cold golf ball the molecules move much more slowly. This makes the ball harder and far less elastic. A warm golf ball remains intact with the clubface for a split second but in that time the ball flattens elastically against the club. More surface area in contact with the clubface means more energy transferred from the club to the ball and the ball launches with astonishing recoil. A cold less elastic go  ...read more

Hiskei Golf Equipment

by: Golf Gear on

Japan is renowned for producing the world’s best golf clubs. Hiskei golf clubs are precisely that - precision hand forged by professional, skilled craftsman using highly advanced materials. Hiskei is rapidly growing globally and is sought after by golfers wanting to play with the finest golf equipment available. Golf Gear Australia is privileged to be the sole distributor of Hiskei Golf Equipment for Australia and New Zealand. The Hiskei range is on display at our Gold Coast golf shop located in Parkwood. Garry Steer, owner of Golf Gear Australia, can offer expert advi  ...read more

When to Re-grip your golf clubs

by: Golf Gear on

When to Re-grip your golf clubs. Worn grips will affect player and club performance and will also increase the wear and tear of your golf glove. Most grips will last between 40 to 50 rounds of golf so if you play once a week you should re-grip your golf clubs every 12 months. After 50 rounds your grips will show signs of deterioration, whether it be in texture, shape or feel. There are many grip choices that will improve your performance. If you wear a large golf glove you should consider using Midsize grips. If you wear a XXL size golf glove you should consider usin  ...read more

Golf Putter: Follow Through to the Finish

by: Golf Gear on

Once the ball has been struck: The arms and shoulders continue to control the club as the V formed by forearms, wrists and hands remains solid. The wrists do not hinge or break, but stay firm to the finish. The head should stay still until the ball has traveled several feet; on short putts, listen for the ball to fall into the cup before lifting your eyes. The putter continues traveling on an arc which mirrors the backstroke. To promote an accelerating stroke, the follow-through should be at least as long as the backstroke.  ...read more

Golf Putter: Impact

by: Golf Gear on

As the putter meets the ball: The positions of your arms, shoulders, head and lower-body should be practically identical to their alignment at address. The hands are slightly ahead of the ball at the instant of contact. The center of the putter head connects with or very near the center of the ball.  ...read more

Golf Putter: Forward Stroke

by: Golf Gear on

Having made a fluid, compact backstroke, the forward stroke is a formality. Maintaining the V formed by the forearms, wrists and hands, use the arms and shoulders to return the putter head to the ball. The forward stroke should accelerate in a single, smooth motion. Do not jerk the putter forward or allow the wrists to break down.  ...read more

Golf Putter: Backstroke

by: Golf Gear on

The backstroke should be guided by the arms and shoulders in a simple, back-and-forth motion, with minimal wrist action. Most golfers use a stroke that takes an inside-square-inside path in relation to the target line (like the full swing); here’s how a sound backstroke works: Maintaining the V formed by the forearms, wrists and hands, use the arms and shoulders to pull the putter back. The wrists should remain locked, but not tense. Focus on the back of the ball, keeping the head still. The knees, hips and torso should be still as well. The length and speed of the putt   ...read more

Golf Putter: Alignment

by: Golf Gear on

The relatively short distance from ball to hole makes lining up putts seem like a simple task. But trying to roll a ball that’s 1.68 inches around into a 4 ¼-inch cup means the margin for error is slim. On a straight putt (one with no left or right break), the putter face should be aligned directly with the hole. On a breaking putt, you must line up with the high point of the break; in other words, the spot where you believe the ball will begin curving toward the cup. Once you’ve determined if and how a putt will move, the alignment process is the same for a stra  ...read more

Golf Putter: Setup

by: Golf Gear on

Like the full swing, stance and posture are crucial building blocks of a sound putting stroke. Follow these simple steps to a proper setup: Stand behind the ball and draw an imaginary line between the ball and the hole (for a straight putt) or the point where you want the ball to start (breaking putt). After stepping into putting position with your feet together, place the putter behind the ball with the face aimed at the target. Now take your putting grip. Spread your feet so that the outside edges of your shoes are shoulder-width apart. You can go a little wider or a little narro  ...read more